Match 7: Sydney Sixers v Perth Scorchers

Match-Ups

Five of the six overs in Perth Scorchers’ Powerplay were bowled by spinners with the Sydney Sixers aware that both Michael Klinger and Shaun Marsh favour seam bowlers and the ball coming on to the bat. Before this match Johan Botha had conceded just 17 (26) against Marsh while Stephen O’Keefe had conceded just 17 (20) against Klinger. Botha and O’Keefe, as well as William Somerville bowled a very tight line in the Powerplay. They conceded just five runs from the first two overs, and across the six overs bowled 13 dot balls (36%) and conceded just two boundaries each. The pressure built by the spinners brought two wickets and put the Sixers ahead in the game despite having lost the toss.

 

The squeeze

After the wicket of Sam Whiteman to a neat catch by Botha on the boundary, between the tenth over to the end of the seventeenth, the Scorchers scored just 38 runs and lost five wickets. In that period the Sixers bowled well and forced some ordinary shots which led to wickets and further stagnated the innings. It was a vicious cycle that begun with good bowling.

 

Of the two spinners Botha bowled a more defensive line, bowling straight and turning it in to the right handers and bowling wide and turning it wider to the left handers. O’Keefe, a left arm spinner, bowled less of a leg side line. Both of them bowled the large majority of their deliveries in line with the stumps and dropped just one delivery short between them.

 

Left armer Ben Dwarshuis ensured that after Botha and O’Keefe were bowled out Mitchell Marsh and the Scorchers deep batting order did not pull away at the death. Dwarshuis, bowling largely round the wicket, cramped the right handers for room, nailed his wide yorkers and gave no width to the left handers.

Scorchers struggle for timing

All eight of the Scorchers dismissals were caught and six of them were from shots that were mis-timed. This can in-part be attributed to good bowling which forced the batsmen out of control and also in-part due to the pitch which a number of players described as being slightly tacky, with the ball sometimes holding up in the pitch and not coming onto the bat as well as in match four at the same ground.

Sixers stroll

There are two ways to go out chasing a small total such as the one the Sixers were faced with, either go out all guns blazing and break the back of the chase early and cruise from there, or manage it carefully from start to finish. The first minimises pressure but increases risk, the second increases pressure but minimises risk. The Sixers opted for the second option, hitting the same number of boundaries as the Scorchers (14) but facing just 35 dot balls compared to the 47 of the Scorchers. It was fitting that when the game did appear to get a little tight with the wicket of Jordan Silk, the experienced head of Botha was there to propel the Sixers over the line.

Sixers go spin-heavy

Speaking after the match Botha said the Sixers felt they had too much pace on the ball in their defeat against the Hobart Hurricanes hence why they made the change to their team of dropping seamer Joe Mennie and bringing in spinner Somerville, who justified his selection with two big wickets.

Selection muddle

It was interesting to compare the Sixers selection against the Scorchers’ who opted to change the balance of their team, resting Mitchell Johnson and replacing him with batsman S Marsh. In hindsight leg spinner James Muirhead, on a pitch that appeared to suit the spinners, would have been a better option. The problem for the Scorchers appears to be they have eight batsmen for seven slots and the only batsman who could conceivably make way for S Marsh is the captain Adam Voges.

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