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CricViz Analysis: England v India, Third Test, Day Three

Ben Jones analyses the ebb and flow of luck between two masters of the game, Virat Kohli and James Anderson.  Read more

CricViz Analysis: The Perfection of James Anderson

Ben Jones analyses the technical refinement and strategic intelligence which has James Anderson still bowling as effectively now as he was 10 years ago. Read more

CricViz Analysis: England v India, Second Test, Day Four

After England claimed victory at Lord’s to go 2-0 up in the Test series against India, Ben Jones analyses another firecracker spell from Stuart Broad. Read more

CricViz Analysis: England v India, Second Test, Day Two

After an extraordinary day at Lord’s, Ben Jones analyses the unique set of circumstances in which India’s batsmen found themselves. Read more

CricViz Analysis: England v India, First Test, Day Four

The first Test of the series will live long in the memory and for that, says Ben Jones, we can thank the wonder of the moving ball. Read more

CricViz Analysis: Virat Kohli – The Evolving Genius

Virat Kohli returns to England a far greater player than the man who averaged 13.40 in 2014. Ben Jones has analysed the constantly shifting batsmanship of the Indian captain. 

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CricViz Analysis: Second Test, Day 1

After a week when Broad and Anderson have been under pressure, Ben Jones examines how England’s veterans flourished by pitching it up.
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ANDERSON LEADS ENGLAND TO VICTORY

England v Pakistan, Second Test, Day Four Analysis

England 589 for 8 dec and 173 for 1 dec (Cook 76*, Root 71*) beat Pakistan 198 and 234 (Hafeez 41, Anderson 3-41, Woakes 3-41) by 330 runs 

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HOW ENGLAND BOWLED OUT PAKISTAN

England v Pakistan, Second Test, Day Three Analysis

England 589 for 8 dec and 98 for 1 (Cook 49*) lead Pakistan 198 (Misbah 52, Woakes 4-67) by 489 runs

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RATING ANDERSON’S MASTERCLASS

Just how good was England’s bowling at Headingley? Sri Lanka’s batsmen struggled in tricky conditions against a skilled attack and CricViz can measure how much more dangerous the hosts’ seamers were than their counterparts.

The BatViz model analyses ball tracking data to produce wicket and run ratings for every ball. We conduct a nearest neighbour analysis of the six Hawk-Eye categories that comprise each ball: speed, line, length, seam, swing and bounce.

This process, counting the runs and wickets associated with the 1,000 most similar deliveries in our database based on those categories, allows the measurement of wicket threat and ease of scoring.

England’s bowlers had an average wicket probability of 1.87% per ball, Sri Lanka’s 1.38%. The top five bowlers in this ranking were members of the home attack, led unsurprisingly by James Anderson (2.13%).

Average wicket probability per ball bowled 
Bowler%
Anderson2.13
Stokes1.90
Vince1.83
Finn1.74
Broad1.71
Eranga1.60
Pradeep1.55
Chameera1.50
Herath1.45
Moeen1.18
Mathews1.13
Shanaka1.12

The Hawk-Eye data from the first Test testifies to Anderson’s mastery of seam and swing. Of the frontline seamers, only Shaminda Eranga had a lower average speed, but the Lancastrian’s 81mph is plenty when combined with lateral movement that no other paceman in the world can match.

Eranga actually swung the ball more on average, but Anderson’s ability to move the ball both ways is crucial. 16 of the 25 biggest inswingers (as faced by a right-hander) were delivered by England’s talisman.

Dangerous swing bowling is partly about controlling the movement in favourable conditions and Anderson is adept at finding just the right amount. Eranga bowled 13 of the 20 biggest outswingers (to right-handers) in the match, but these were not of the right line or length to trouble the batsmen.

Anderson can famously switch between inswing and outswing with little discernible change in action, a skill that is especially useful in the context of expert seam bowling. He possessed the highest average seam movement in the match.

Average wicket probability per ball faced 
Batsman%
Herath2.38
Mathews2.08
Karunaratne2.07
Mendis1.98
Finn1.94

Applying the wicket probability ratings to each batsman, the struggles faced by the visiting batsmen become clear. Of frontline batsmen the highest average wicket probability per ball was faced by Angelo Mathews (2.08%) and Dimuth Karunaratne (2.07%).

That the best was kept for the two most experienced opposing batsmen says much about the efficiency of England’s bowling. Anderson’s unique combination of seam, swing and accuracy, a combination that has brought him 443 Test wickets, was too good for the tourists.